Sign in

Forgotten your password?

Sign up for free Smith membership

×
Sign up for free

Sign in

×
Forgotten your password?

Enter your account email address and we’ll send you a link to reset your password (it should only take a few seconds)

Sign in

×
Are you sure you want to sign out of Smith?
×
Show
Hide

iFrame []

URL:

  • Cityscape Beautifully built Califal capital
  • City life Tapas, dancing

Architecturally astonishing and alive with history, the stately, statuesque city of Córdoba is an Andalucian wonderland of whitewashed walls and winding streets.

If there were a golden triangle of Spanish/Moorish architecture (and there is – just look at a map and join the dots) you’ll find Córdoba at the peak with Seville and Granada making up the foundations. Smaller and more easily overlooked than its higher-profile neighbours, Córdoba holds its own over both: avoiding the tourist logjam of Granada, and, according to UNESCO, which branded the city centre a world heritage site in 1984, boasting better-preserved buildings than Seville. Its dinky size makes Córdoba the perfect place for the ever-so-slightly sluggish sightseer (ancient walled city: check. Jewish quarter: check. world’s third largest mosque: check), and, like its fellow Andalucian towns, it’s always got matadors on its mind, tapas in its mouth and flamenco in its footsteps.

Do go/Don’t go

As with the rest of inland Spain – scorchio summer months are to be avoided. Spring months such as May can be the most blissfully balmy.

Getting thereView map

  • Planes Seville and Malaga have the closest airports | both about two hours away by car and both hosting regular flights to/from Luton | Gatwick and Stansted. Easyjet is the most prolific airline if you’re coming from the UK.
  • Trains The Renfe’s high-speed AVE trains link Córdoba to Madrid (under two hours) and Malaga (under an hour) and to Seville in an amazing 25 minutes. The train station’s to the north of the city, just off the Avenida de América – bus number 3 ferries you between there and the historic centre.
  • Automobiles Córdoba’s streets are made for walking | and you couldn’t even fit a car in the winding thoroughfares of the Jewish quarter | but if you want to explore the province and the nearby towns | you should rent one. Alternatively | hire a GPS-equipped electric buggy from www.blobject.es – they’re small enough to squeeze into the tightest spaces.
  • Taxis Petite Córdoba is a very walkable town… but if you must resort to wheels then Radio Taxi has the number to call www.radiotaxiCórdoba.com; (+34 95 776 4444).