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Hotel Highlights

  • Secreted away in Soho
  • A stroll from restaurants such as The Ivy and Hakkasan
  • The best of the West End on your lap

Overview

Historic and elegant, part of the lure of Hazlitt’s is that, even with it’s central London location in the heart of Soho, it remains surprisingly discreet and quiet. Its 30 rooms are spread across a trio of charming old houses and decorated with dark woods, bookshelves, antiques, and oil paintings. With creaky stairs and a wonky landing, every turn brings to mind the 300 year history of Hazlitt’s, which takes its name from the 18th-century writer, William Hazlitt, who lived here.

Smith Extra

Here's what you get for booking Hazlitt's with us:

A bottle of red or white wine if you're staying in a club or superior double, or prosecco if you've booked a deluxe room, junior suite or the Duke of Monmouth.

Special offers

Exclusive rates, packages and special offers at Hazlitt's

15% off a three-night stay

Facilities

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Hazlitt's Hotel - London - United Kingdom

Need To Know

Rooms

30, including three deluxe doubles, two junior suites and one suite.

Check–out

Midday, but flexible where possible.

Rates

Double rooms from $312.36 (£183), excluding tax at 20 per cent.

More details

Rates exclude breakfast.

Also

The hotel has a library where you can pick from the several books before curling up by the fireplace. There's also the Wardrobe, once used to store aristocrats' valuable, now a modern meeting space. Fledgling writers on some form of literary pilgrimage often leave a signed copy of their latest manuscript – guests can borrow these (often first-edition) books.

At the hotel

TV, broadband, in-house movies, Ren products, library.

Our favourite rooms

Most of the bedrooms have freestanding clawfooted baths, Victorian bathroom fittings and antique beds. Baron Willoughby, the junior suite, has a carved-oak bed and big rolltop bath. Jonathan Swift has a luxurious sofa and a 12-inch showerhead. The Duke of Monmouth suite has an outdoor terrace with a retractable roof and enormous water-spouting gold structure on the edge of the bath.

Packing tips

A volume of William Hazlitt's essays on city life; a quill and pot of ink to write your own.

Also

The hotel can arrange in-room massages, beauty treatments and yoga. They’ll also help you sort out flowers and cakes for special occasions.

Children

Extra bed, £30; cribs are free. Babysitting on request.

Food & Drink

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Hazlitt's Hotel - London - United Kingdom

Hotel Restaurant

There's no restaurant, but all of Soho's restaurants are on your doorstep. Breakfast can be served in your room, but the lure of freshly baked croissants might get you downstairs to the Library.

Hotel Bar

There's an honesty bar open all hours where guests are welcome to entertain friends.

Room service

Order in wholesome British classics like bangers and mash or a hearty pie at any hour of the day.

Smith Insider

Dress code

18th-century finery to match your historic surrounds.

Local Guide

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Eat, drink, see, do: local favourites and more…

Local restaurants

Hakkasan on Hanway Place (+44 (0)20 7927 7000) is a dark and seductive place where you can dine on excellent Chinese food and sup very powerful, very good cocktails. Perch on a stool in the tiled former-butcher's interior of Randall & Aubin on Brewer Street (+44 (0)20 7287 4447) for seafood or a grill. Dinner at The Ivy on West Street (+44 (0)20 7836 4751) promises showbiz faces among your fellow diners. The real reason to book well in advance, though, is the surprisingly reasonable classic British dishes, among oak panelling and stained glass. J Sheekey on St Martin's Court (+44 (0)20 7240 2565) is another favourite specialising in fish and seafood. Refined Ligurian dishes come according to the season at Giardinetto (+44 (0)20 7493 7091), the Italian that has recently moved to Mayfair. Chowki(+44 (0)20 7439 1330) on Denmark Street has won awards for its well-priced homestyle regional Indian cuisine. Sketch on Conduit Street (+44 (0)870 777 4488) is celebrated for its extravagant, futuristic design, and offers French-fusion, brasserie fare or delicate patisseries in its tearoom.

Local bars

Salvador & Amanda (+44 (0)20 7240 1551) is a tapas bar with DJ on Fridays and Saturdays. Bar Italia (+44 (0)20 7437 4520) serves espressos into the small hours. Lab on Old Compton Street (+44 (0)20 7437 7820) is a bar with mean mixologists. The Endurance on Berwick Street (+44 (0)20 7437 2944) is perfect for a pint and some posh pub grub.

+ Enlarge
Insiders' Soho

Hazlitt's

6 Frith Street, Soho Square, London, W1D 3JA, United Kingdom

Planes

London Heathrow is a 40-minute drive from the hotel.

Trains

Hazlitt's is in the middle of Soho, with several Tube stations dotted around – the nearest is Tottenham Court Road (on the Central and Northern line), two minutes away. Leicester Square, on the Piccadilly line that goes to Heathrow, is a five-minute walk from the hotel. The nearest overland stations are Charing Cross and Paddington.

Automobiles

The hotel's super-central setting makes bringing a car unwise – stick to your legs, buses and Tubes.

Reviews

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Hazlitt's Hotel - London - United Kingdom

Anonymous review

by Scott Manson , Rock-star writer

London’s black-cab drivers are the best in the world: honest, courteous, and trained for five years to know pretty much every street in the Big Smoke. The only trouble with this is that they refuse to admit defeat. In that respect, Hazlitt’s is the cabbie’s nemesis. A small door with a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it sign means a navigational headache for London’s finest. &…
Read more

Hazlitt's

Anonymous review by Scott Manson, Rock-star writer

London’s black-cab drivers are the best in the world: honest, courteous, and trained for five years to know pretty much every street in the Big Smoke. The only trouble with this is that they refuse to admit defeat. In that respect, Hazlitt’s is the cabbie’s nemesis. A small door with a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it sign means a navigational headache for London’s finest.

‘Hazlitt’s – er, right you are, fella,’ said our cabbie, scratching his head. After a couple of random right and left turns he started the give-us-a-clue game that every driver plays on the rare occasions that they’re stumped by an address. You could almost hear the mental filing-cabinet doors opening and closing. Finally, after a circle of Soho Square and a perfunctory probe down Greek Street, we found Frith Street and the understated entrance to Hazlitt’s. You could see the cabbie studying the sign carefully, burning the boutique hotel’s location into his memory bank.

To be fair to him, few people know of Hazlitt’s. Part of its considerable charm is that, despite its central location, the hotel’s success is based solely on word-of-mouth recommendations. Spread across three historic houses in the heart of Soho, it takes its name from William Hazlitt, the 18th-century essayist who lived there. If few people know the hotel’s address, then fewer still know of its namesake. Mrs Smith and I compared our scant literary knowledge, and decided we really must find out more about this writer sometime – it's only polite seeing as we're staying in his house.

When Hazlitt was scribbling here, there were no lifts, of course. There still aren’t but, fortunately, the plumbing and heating have been recently updated. Despite some necessary modern functionality (including satellite TV and broadband access), the whole place still retains an olde-world charm. From the creaky stairs up to our room to a wonky landing at the top, its tilt the result of 300 years of slowly shifting woodwork, Hazlitt’s offers comfortable, stylish accommodation with an air of quirky elegance.

All the rooms are named after famous writers or famous residents, which, in any other hotel, might be unbearably twee. This place pulls it off. Our room, Jonathan Swift, is named after the writer of Gulliver’s Travels and, true to form, the vast bed made us feel positively Lilliputian when we climbed onto it. The hotel’s owners had the good sense to retain much of the original panelling, and the good taste to furnish it with antiques and period furniture in line with its Georgian grandeur. A beautiful old writing desk sits against one wall, with a bookshelf of yellowing hardbacks adding further literary flourish. Heavy curtains and secondary glazing keep out the bright lights and noise of Soho, but I’d encourage you to keep them open so you can soak up the atmosphere of London’s most vibrant neighbourhood.

A squeal from the bathroom suggested that my lady had just discovered the generous selection of Aveda goodies that was awaiting her. In fact, it was the bathtub that had tickled her fancy – deep enough for two, and fed by brass pipes that looked as though they’d be equally at home in the pump room of a Victorian bathing house. For those less inclined to wallow, an oversized rainfall showerhead provides an eminently satisfying drench.

After our bit of sport with the taxi driver, we thought we’d give the front-desk staff a little work-out too. We wanted a recommendation for a pre-dinner drink, and reservations for two at Hakkasan, London’s hippest restaurant. ‘There’s no way that they’ll sort that out,’ said my partner. In my heart, I had to agree, since there’s usually a week-long waiting list but, hey, what’s the point of reviewing a hotel if you can’t be a little bit difficult? Ten minutes later, the phone rings. It’s the front-desk girl confirming, with just a touch of pride in her voice, that the reservation is secured.

Armed with the knowledge that we’d soon be tucking into Michelin-starred Chinese food, we struck out for a stroll across Soho. Its ‘den of vice’ incarnation firmly in the past, it’s still unpolished enough to have an edge, but generally filled with nice people eating in nice restaurants and being nice to each other.

There’s an overwhelming choice of fine drinking spots, from cute old pubs to spendy cocktail bars and secret members’ clubs. Most of the latter are closed to the casual visitor, but a bit of inside knowledge from our hotel concierge let us know that there was one place that we’d get into: the ever-so-cool Milk and Honey on Poland Street. As we were ushered in and our names crossed off a list (we’re not members but rang beforehand) we had a brief moment of nervous giggling as our eyes adjusted to the low lighting. Once inside, you can see why previous visitors have compared it to an American speakeasy. Jazz plays in the background, the service is fast, and the whole place is just outrageously decadent, from the discreet banquettes to the well-chosen cocktail list.

Several martinis later, we found our way to Hakkasan. It’s another sexy subterranean joint, crammed with beautiful people (and us) eating high-end Oriental cuisine. Think about the best Chinese restaurant you’ve ever eaten at, and then forget it, because it can’t touch this place. We stuck to dim sum and, it has to be said, over-ordered hugely. The giveaway was when we asked the waitress if we’d ordered enough and she started giggling. Space doesn’t permit me to list the lot but you have to try the soft-shell crab, the fried crispy-duck rolls and any of the steamed dim sum dishes. We had every one of the latter, so I can safely recommend all of them.

Back at the hotel, the massive bed gave us a memorable night’s sleep. Perhaps the greatest pleasure came first thing in the morning as we sat by the window and watched Soho awake. It’s a curious thing to see a city come alive from an historic room like this one – the experience wouldn’t have been the same had we been looking out from the window of some centrally located chain hotel. With our first-floor sash window open, we could hear the sound of shop traders exchanging banter, and smell the first coffees of the day being brewed down the street at Bar Italia. We felt part of the city, rather than simply tourists. And that is surely the mark of a special hotel.

The Guestbook

Reviews of Hazlitt's from Smith members

Whenever you book a stay through us, we’ll invite you to comment when you get back. Read the Guestbook entries below to see what real-life Mr & Mrs Smiths have said about this hotel…

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

Rooms were beautifully decorated, showers were good, I loved the slightly shabby antique furniture, the staff was incredibly helpful, and I liked the public areas and honesty bar.

Don’t expect

Rooms at the back of the hotel are much quieter than those at the front!

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

This is a nice and romantic hotel in the middle of the Soho nightlife. A lot of London's attractions can be reached by foot. The hotel staff does everything to make your stay just perfect.

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

I loved the thoughtful and elegant decor and design that retains a real sense of the earlier uses and history of the buildings; the extraordinarily helpful staff who showed genuine concern when we had trouble with our ongoing travel plans and did more than I could ever have expected to help us sort out our problems; the central location just off Soho Square, which you might think would be noisy with the nearby bars and crowds but is the essence of peace and quite once you cross the Hazlitt's threshold.

Don’t expect

I really don't want to fault Hazlitt's but if I must make a suggestion it would be for a little more light in the Sir Joseph Banks room – it's perfect most of the time but when packing it could be brighter.

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

The hotel is positively antique, yet very clean, with stunning funiture and rooms. Service is very personal. I enjoyed the great in-room breakfast, and it's a nice contrast to the surrounding business of Soho.

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

I liked the great location, and the hotel's really stylish, comfortable and so peaceful. All the staff were great, too.

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

I liked the ambience: relaxed Britishness.

Don’t expect

I would've liked an open bar ;)

Rating: 7/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

I loved the friendly and personal service; nothing was any trouble. The room was very comfortable and not at all noisy, which I wasn't expecting due to the location.

Don’t expect

I cant really find fault. My husband was alarmed at the sloping floors but you have to expect this with old London townhouses. I personally thought it added to the charm.

Rating: 8/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

The location was great.

Don’t expect

The room was quite warm as we were at the top of the house.

Rating: 7/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

It was exceptionally well run and very friendly, ideally located for all West End activity; I will be back!

Don’t expect

The location of the safe in the wardrobe was a bit of a knee bender for anyone outside their teens

Rating: 10/10 stars

GoldSmith

Stayed on

We loved

It's in the centre of Soho so perfect for theatre and a luxury London weekend in the hub of it all. It's close to fantastic restaurants and Golden Square for bars and clubs too!

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

A hidden gem a world apart from the bustling, buzzy streets of Soho, Hazlitt's is a discreet, beautiful boutique hotel that transports you back to the 18th century (but with proper modern amenities.) One of the loveliest hotel rooms I've ever stayed in, the Dr. John Snow (rooms are named after historical and literary figures, rather than given numbers) boasted a four-poster wooden bed with lovely linens, a plush and invitingly deep window seat, and a huge bathroom that is bigger than a typical single hotel room in London. The bathroom was fantastic - it had a Victorian freestanding tub, a massive tiled shower with a waterfall showerhead set in the ceiling, and a hand-carved wooden toilet that looked (and felt like) a throne. Each room has its own style, and ours featured repurposed woodwork and arches that looked like they may have come out of a church. Service was also very friendly and efficient. We loved the complimentary bottle of prosecco that came with our booking, and enjoyed it in the library before a roaring fire. The library features an honour bar that allows you the privacy of mixing your own drinks in a very comfortable setting. Since my husband is also a writer, he loved the fact that this is considered a 'writer's escape' - several bookcases feature signed first editions of writers who have stayed here (including JK Rowling and Anthony Bourdain). All of this does not come cheap, but it was an unforgettable place to celebrate our anniversary.

Don’t expect

I would have appreciated coffee- or tea-making facilities in the room, and the street noise at night can be quite loud (there was a huge fight in the middle of the night just outside our window in the alley next to a 'gentlemen's club'.) Be aware that while Soho has gotten quite gentrified, there are still dodgy parts to the neighbourhood. The Victorian plumbing can be quirky, and the front desk could do better warning you about this. For some reason the towel warmers in our bathroom never worked, and the cold water would not come out of the sink taps if we were running a bath at the same time.

Rating: 10/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

The hotel was very traditional in style, which I loved. With all the old paintings and furniture, it was like being taken back hundreds of years. We were given a free upgrade, which was very kind. Staff were friendly, fast and accommodating. The hotel had a nice feel to it.

 

Don’t expect

The hotel is quite noisy. The noise from the street was loud – whether this was noise from a bar, people partying, street cleaning, or refuse collections. Then again, we were in the heart of Soho. Yet I did feel that my sleep was disturbed by the outside noise. Also, when the people above us were up and about we could hear them. However, it is an old townhouse – maybe that was to be expected?

 

Rating: 7/10 stars

BlackSmith

Stayed on

We loved

Loved it, what an amazing place, full of character and right in the heart of Soho. We were upgraded to the 'best room in the house'- Duke of Monmouth Suite. A duplex suite with its own terrace for breakfast and massive stone bath in the bedroom. Incredibly romantic and perfect for a honeymoon or anniversary. The staff were incredibly welcoming and helpful- just perfect all round!

Don’t expect

Perfect for us. However, no restaurants for dinner and that may bother some (but breakfast on the terrace was fab). As you are bang in the middle of Soho, you are really spoilt for choice.

Rating: 10/10 stars

SilverSmith

Stayed on

We loved

Great hotel in London. Super location in Soho (walking distance to theatres, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, British Museum, just to name a few). If you love history, this is your kind of place because the rooms are named after historic figures of the area. Lots of great restaurants around.

Don’t expect

Sometimes the room was a bit dark for things like putting on make-up.

Rating: 10/10 stars